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This event is open for all professionals interested or currently working in Starups in Hanoi, or supply chai professionals in Hanoi, or who are interested in looking for business collaboration for U.S. market through meeting with a delegation of Baylor University (U.S.), Executive Master Program.

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SOURCING / BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER - FERGUSON GLOBAL

Ferguson Global is seeking a Sourcing / Business Development Manager to assist in our Southeast Asia sourcing expansion. This position will report directly to our Regional Manager based in Taiwan and work closely with our staff at Ferguson Enterprises, LLC headquarters in Newport News, VA, USA.

PROJECT MANAGER - ALCON SINGAPORE

The Project Manager (PMO) is a highly visible role that is responsible for driving the transformation activities for Singapore Replenishment Center (SRC) and 3rd party service providers’ warehouses migration from current location to a new location. This leader will lead cross-functional internal and external resources and has overall accountability of the execution and performance of projects and transformation initiatives.

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Manage DC daily operation activities at warehouse facility. To ensure strict execution of the SOP and meet KPIs.

ROBOTS AT THE GATE: HUMANS AND TECHNOLOGY AT WORK

2020-05-12 18:47:42

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ROBOTS AT THE GATE: HUMANS AND TECHNOLOGY AT WORK

Technology and the future of work

 

Over the centuries, technological progress has evoked both fear and fascination, especially in terms of the impact on labour. Even as the Industrial Revolution forever changed the trajectory of human progress, leading voices of the 19th century remained divided on how it could affect workers. One of the most influential economists of all time, David Ricardo, flip-flopped on the issue. In 1821, he stated that while he had previously felt that using machinery in production was a general good, he was now more worried about the substitution effect on labour. And the discussion was not always academic – the Luddite movement was an early example of workers resorting to violence to protest the use of technology in textile factories.

 

As the decades passed, the Industrial Revolution led to a visible, massive improvement in living standards. But the debate – on how technology affects work and whether it is an unequivocal positive – continued to wax and wane. It reared its head again in the 1960s, when US President Lyndon Johnson set up a commission to study the impact of automation on jobs. The commission noted that “technology eliminates jobs, not work.” But it did acknowledge that the pace of technology on the workforce was severe enough that the government considered radical measures such as “guaranteed minimum income” and “government as the employer of last resort.”

 

In the past few years, the debate has been renewed. Technological luminary Bill Gates has suggested that it might be time to tax robots. The idea of a basic universal income has resurfaced, with Finland launching a two-year pilot last year. Elon Musk of Tesla and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg engaged in a public war of words a few months ago on the risks and opportunities of Artificial Intelligence (AI).1 Futurists such as Ray Kurzweil have been relentlessly optimistic about the impact of a new generation of technological improvements. The International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as well as think tanks such as the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), have all published studies discussing how advances in machine learning and robotics could fundamentally reshape the global workforce.

 

Meanwhile, central bankers from around the world believe technology is one reason why super-low unemployment rates have failed to cause sharp rises in wage inflation. After taking a few decades off, the age-old debate – on how technology will change the future of work – is back with a vengeance. To understand this phenomenon, we first look at ways in which human skill-sets differ from machines.

Read full article here.